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Category: Blogging

Lovholm.net back with new layout

Lovholm.net back with new layout

In recent years the activity on lovholm.net has decreased.. unfortunately. Hopefully, I will soon be able to kick-start some new articles, as I have picked up a few new things I want to share with the world over the last few years.

As you may have noticed if you been visiting this page earlier, it does not look quite like it did a few months or five years ago. The last larger update of the page (WordPress engine updates excluded) was back in 2011 (six years ago!? times goes fast) while I was doing my studies in Edinburgh. As the world moves on, I saw it fit to change the visual template, update a few plugins, and do a clean install of the WordPress installation.

That being said: Welcome to the new page!

It may be some glitches, there may be some source code not correctly formatted, and pictures may be missing. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if some content on the page, which you want to read, does not render properly or there are missing pictures etc. Although I will try and go through the most vital parts of the page, the updates and checking are usually done sporadically.

Five year anniversary

Five year anniversary

Five years ago I published the first blog post on this page, and 130 posts later I’m happy I managed my goal of writing a post now and then. Much have happened the last five years, and I hope more will happen in the five years to come. Hopefully you will find a similar post on the ten years anniversary 4th April 2017.

Thank you for reading!

Ok, I’m very enthusiastic about readers, so after a day with many readers in Google Analytics I may be like this, especially with many revisiting users. I hope to see you again:

entusiastic_gif_celebration

The Writing Epiphany

The Writing Epiphany

I’ve been back in Edinburgh for over a week since my little trip to Norway, and as an epiphany the sudden realization of how much I have to write until mid-August. I’ve picked up many interesting points the last week from doing experiments with Open Data, and visualizations learned from the book Visualizing Data by Ben Fry. In addition I read the first half of Clay Shirky’s Here comes everybody (This book was recently listed on the Guardian’s 100 best non-fiction books).

It is a common conception that a text will be easy to write as soon as the thoughts are structured in the mind. I have several times been a victim of this idea. Several times I have read far too much, without getting a word to the paper (or in my case, to the text editor). This is a dangerous trend as words tend to change as they leave the dynamic, flexible realm of the internal mind when they manifest themselves as an own entity in the form of a text on paper or in a computers hard-drive.

This time I wanted to challenge this common conception, and rather try to start writing early. Already in May I started to gather some notes from literature, but much of what I wrote now seems redundant. From the same trip I do have a good conversation with Sverre Lunde-Danbolt, the project leader for data.norge.no, (thank you for your help) which I need to transcribe. I also have some questions to formulate to further interviews, but I feel I have more knowledge about the subject area now than when I decided to write about the data.gov phenomenon (if you read this, do you have any better term for this phenomenon which does not contain the word ‘phenomenon’? )

Today’s goal is to have a good text on the governmental data sites for the UK, US and Norwegian government.

 

The picture is taken by Mike McKay, and licensed under Creative Commons. Please refer to his Flickr-page for more information.

How to set up a Blog

How to set up a Blog

There are many popular and free services on the Internet for creating and sharing your own content. However many of these services has limitations when it comes to space, freedom to alter the system and making your personal touch. However these services proves to be very useful combined with a personal domain and web site. Set up one today, it is cheap, easy and is done in very few steps. Here is a short guide to help you on your way.

1. Choose a web host

There are many host out there (in the clouds) that are ready to provide you with some space, a domain name and a database. You just have to decide for one. For several years I have been using One. They provide a database, and lots of storage at a low fee, and it is easy to use their online interface and register with them. The downside is that they often load many sites on the same servers, and many think they are quite slow. However, unless you are going to make a huge, intricate API system that doesn’t tolerate any waiting time or the new Facebook they work fine. For a personal homepage or similar it works perfectly. Prices are listed in space (How many MB you get), in traffic (some charges you more if you share a high amount of data) and domain registration (a fee for reserving and linking a domain name to your site).

2. Find a domain name

This is fun. You know the thing which is written before the dot in the address field. You can decide you own. For the time being I have registered two domains lovholm.net and m3dia.me. A domain subscription is lasting for a year, and has to be renewed. You have a lot of suffixes to choose between, some are international (or American) such as .net, .org, .com and .mobi. Others are national such as .uk, .no, .se and .dk. There is also a third alternative which is actually national domains, but because of their special names they are perceived as domain hacks, these are .me (Macedonia), .tv (Tuvalu-something) and .iq (Iraq). There are millions of posts of there filled with tips on how you can choose the best domain name, but here are the three most important 1: Something which is easy to remember 2: Something which is easy to write 3: Not too many words.

3. Register with the web host

Registering is easy. You will need to fill in name, address and other personal information. In most cases you will also need an e-mail account as well. If you don’t have one yet (really!?) sign up with Google, gmail is the new Royal Mail. After you have found your domain name, and registered, you can wait for one or two days since the registration has to be processed. Eventually you will get an e-mail with login information. Some web services will also need some real-world evidence that you are who you say you are. This could be code sent via SMS or a form which you have to download, sign and return.

4. Find a CMS or build your own site

Now the fun part starts. You do now own your little Internet-cabin, pal. Let us fill it with some content. If you now write your domain name in to the address field one of two things are likely to happen: Nothing there, or a page with the logo of the company you registered with. Great, now we have to decide for a CMS (Content Management System). I use WordPress, its Open Source, free and very easy to use, expand and customize. The first step towards content on the page is to upload something to your site. This is located at a server in the company you decided to work with. You will need to connect to their server and upload your files there. (Maybe the files you downloaded from WordPress). This is best done with the File Transfer Protocol, FTP, using the settings you got in the registration email earlier. If you upload wordpress, you should be able to just write the path name in the address field of your browser. From here you will need to fill in a three step form mainly about admin password, database info and Name of your site. When this is done all you have to do is to log into the back-end system yourwebpage.com/wp-admin and fill in username and password. Congratulations, you do now have your own webpage.

5. Be online for real!

You did it! Congratulations. Send me a link to your new domain, or post in the comment field under. Read you later!